Special Report

50 Most Popular Restaurants That Won’t Reopen After the Pandemic

Source: Courtesy of Dan R. via Yelp

Massachusetts: Legal Test Kitchen
> Location: Boston

A branch of the famed Massachusetts fish and shellfish chain Legal Seafoods, this once-bustling 15-year-old establishment in Boston’s Seaport district is now out of business, according to information reported on Aug. 27. “Due to the lack of area business and travel … “the company felt it didn’t make sense to reopen the location,” Legal explained to Boston.com. There is one other Test Kitchen location at the city’s Logan Airport (the idea was that the Test Kitchens would experiment on dishes not found on the chain’s usual menus). It is currently closed but will reopen in early fall. Meanwhile, 11 other Legal Seafood locations around the state remain open.

Source: Courtesy of Markovski's Family Restaurant via Facebook

Michigan: Markovski’s Family Restaurant
> Location: Dearborn Heights

After 50 years in business in this suburb of Detroit, Markovski’s, famous for its stuffed cabbage, kielbasa, and other Polish specialties, has said goodbye. In a statement on Facebook, the proprietors declared that “A worldwide pandemic was the only thing that could separate our tightly knit family [and] if you were here, you were definitely family.”

Source: Courtesy of Butcher & the Boar via Facebook

Minnesota: Butcher & the Boar
> Location: Minneapolis

Aug. 31 was the last night of service for this downtown Minneapolis establishment — described by the Star Tribune as a “loud, lively, fun-loving restaurant” with “a one-of-a-kind” menu attracting “crowds and critical acclaim.” A sign posted on the door of the 8-year-old restaurant read in part, “Due to Covid 19 and the unrest in Minneapolis we are sadly closing our doors permanently.” A second location in Charleston, South Carolina, remains open.

Source: Courtesy of Bay L. via Yelp

Minnesota: Fuji Ya
> Location: Minneapolis

When Reiko Weston opened Fuji Ya in 1959, it was apparently the first-ever Japanese restaurant in Minnesota. It expanded and spawned offshoots. Weston died in 1988, and two years later the place closed down — until her daughter brought it back to life in 1997. The restaurant shuttered temporarily in early May, but by the end of that month, its website carried the message: “Thank you for your support! Unfortunately we are closing our doors.”

Source: Courtesy of Sam A. via Yelp

Missouri: Cusanelli’s
> Location: St. Louis

Occupying a building that traces its history back two centuries, this institution in the city’s Lemay neighborhood — featuring what it billed as “The Original St. Louis Style Pizza” — opened in 1954. It became a family favorite, and comments on the restaurant’s Facebook page sentimentally recall first dates, birthdays, anniversaries, and other momentous occasions celebrated there. It was also on Facebook that the owners announced that Aug. 30 would be the restaurant’s last night of service, “Due to covid and unforeseen circumstances …”