The Richest County in Each State

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6. Douglas County, Colorado
> County median household income: $101,591
> State median household income: $58,433
> Pct. households in county making $200,000 or more: 13.2%
> 2013 county unemployment rate: 5.4%

Douglas County residents are very well educated. Over the five years through 2013, 97.5% had at least a high school diploma, and nearly 56% had at least a bachelor’s degree, both among the highest educational attainment rates nationwide. The area’s poverty rate of less than 4% was also one of the lowest poverty rates. The county’s well educated residents also had high incomes. Douglas County’s households had an annual median income of $101,591 over the five years through 2013, one of the highest. Across the state, however, income was not particularly well distributed. Douglas County’s median income was nearly $68,000 higher than the state’s poorest county’s income, one of the largest such gaps.

7. Fairfield County, Connecticut
> County median household income: $82,283
> State median household income: $69,461
> Pct. households in county making $200,000 or more: 17.0%
> 2013 county unemployment rate: 7.1%

Windham County, the poorest in Connecticut, had an annual median household income of $59,333 over the five years through 2013 — the only poorest county in a state to have an income greater than the national figure. On the other hand, Fairfield County, the richest in the state, had an annual median household income of $82,283 over that period, not especially high compared with other states’ richest counties. Also unlike many of the other wealthiest counties reviewed, more than 7% of Fairfield County’s workforce was unemployed in 2013, one of the higher unemployment rates. The residents’ wealth is due in large part to the county’s proximity to New York City, where many residents commute to work.

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8. New Castle County, Delaware
> County median household income: $64,537
> State median household income: $59,878
> Pct. households in county making $200,000 or more: 6.1%
> 2013 county unemployment rate: 6.7%

The income gap between Delaware’s richest and poorest counties was not nearly as great as in many other states. Residents of New Castle County earned $64,537 a year over the five years through 2013, less than $12,000 more than the comparable figure in Sussex County, the state’s poorest region.

9. St. Johns County, Florida
> County median household income: $64,876
> State median household income: $46,956
> Pct. households in county making $200,000 or more: 8.4%
> 2013 county unemployment rate: 5.6%

St Johns County had an annual median household income of nearly $65,000 over the five years through 2013, the highest in the state. While incomes were not especially high compared to most of the other states’ richest counties, it was roughly double the comparable income in Putnam County, the poorest in Florida.

10. Forsyth County, Georgia
> County median household income: $86,569
> State median household income: $49,179
> Pct. households in county making $200,000 or more: 9.8%
> 2013 county unemployment rate: 6.0%

Nearly 86% of Forsyth County homes were owned by their occupants, one of the highest homeownership rates nationwide. High incomes in the area likely made homeownership more accessible to many residents. Forsyth households had a median annual income of $86,569 over the five years through 2013, the highest in the state, and among the higher incomes nationwide.