America’s Most (and Least) Valuable States

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41. Idaho
> Value of land per acre:
$3,435
> Total value: $182 billion (14th lowest)
> Total acres: 53.0 million (10th largest)

A majority of Idaho, 65%, was federally owned, the third highest percentage nationwide. The U.S. government’s land accounted for nearly half of Idaho’s overall value, the second highest such contribution. Like many other states with relatively low land valuation, less than 2% of Idaho was classified as developed.

42. Nebraska
> Value of land per acre:
$2,936
> Total value: $144 billion (9th lowest)
> Total acres: 49.1 million (14th largest)

No state had more of its land — 92.7% — designated as agricultural than Nebraska. This partly accounts for the relatively low value, as developed land tends to be valued far more. An average acre in Nebraska was valued at less than $3,000.

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43. North Dakota
> Value of land per acre:
$2,517
> Total value: $110 billion (6th lowest)
> Total acres: 43.7 million (18th largest)

Nearly 91% of land in North Dakota was agricultural — second only to Nebraska — and it accounted for more than a third of the state’s total value, the fourth largest such contribution. The land estimate does not fully account for North Dakota’s ongoing energy boom, and the state’s value was likely far higher.

44. Montana
> Value of land per acre:
$2,283
> Total value: $213 billion (16th lowest)
> Total acres: 93.3 million (3rd largest)

Montana spans more than 93 million acres, making the state the third largest in the lower 48 states. Each acre was worth just $2,283 on average, however, one of the lowest values. More than 65% of Montana was classified as agricultural, the 10th largest percentage.

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45. South Dakota
> Value of land per acre:
$2,135
> Total value: $103 billion (5th lowest)
> Total acres: 48.2 million (15th largest)

More than 90% of South Dakota was designated as agricultural, the third highest percentage in the contiguous U.S. And land used for farming purposes accounted for 44.1% of South Dakota’s overall value, the second highest such contribution. By contrast, less than 3% of the state was developed property, which tends to be far more valuable than other types of land. South Dakota was worth an estimated $103 billion, the fifth lowest total value.