Countries With the Best (and Worst) Jobs

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3. Chad
> Pct. of adults with “good” jobs:
7%
> Pct. of adults with “great” jobs: 1%
> GDP per capita: $2,186
> Life expectancy: 51.2 years

Landlocked in Central Africa, Chad has long suffered from poor infrastructure, high poverty, and political unrest. Like many other African nations, quality employment is also scarce. Only 7% of the adult population is working in a job that provides at least 30 hours of work a week and a steady paycheck, the third smallest share of all surveyed countries. Only 1% of the nation’s adults have a job that is both stable and fulfilling. The lower rates of steady employment in Chad accompany high poverty rates. Roughly 47% of the country lived below the nation’s poverty line as of 2011.

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2. Mali
> Pct. of adults with “good” jobs:
6%
> Pct. of adults with “great” jobs: 1%
> GDP per capita: $1,662
> Life expectancy: 55.0 years

Only 6% of the adult population in Mali has a job that provides at least 30 hours of work a week and a steady paycheck. Just 1% of the landlocked West African nation’s adult population has a great job. Other, more traditional measures also point to poor quality of life and economic weakness in Mali. Only 33.6% of adults in the country are literate, a lower literacy rate than in all but a handful of other countries. Mali’s GDP per capita is also among the lowest in the world. Adjusting for global price differences, the nation’s GDP is $1,662 per resident. By contrast, in the United States, GDP per capita is nearly $50,000.

1. Burkina Faso
> Pct. of adults with “good” jobs:
5%
> Pct. of adults with “great” jobs: 1%
> GDP per capita: $1,481
> Life expectancy: 56.3 years

Burkina Faso residents have some of the worst job prospects in the world. Just 5% of adults in the country are gainfully employed, the lowest among countries reviewed. According to Gallup, the especially low percentage is at least partly due to the high numbers of self-employed individuals in the country. Less than 1% of adults living in Burkina Faso have completed the equivalent of high school, one of the lowest attainment rates worldwide. Poor education levels likely contributed to the relatively low numbers of full-time, well-paying occupations. While a large and growing economy by no means guarantees higher levels of full-time employment, let alone job satisfaction, economic growth in Burkina Faso may create more good, and even great, jobs. The country’s economy grew by 6.6% in 2014, one of the largest growth rates worldwide.

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